How to Become a Travel Psychologist


When it comes to allied health careers, therapy and psychology require some of the most extensive education out there. While you may be early in your psychology career, it’s important to explore all possible job options. Many who are looking for an exciting career often wonder how they can become a travel psychologist. If you decide to become a travel psychologist, you’ll be given the opportunity to explore the country while helping others. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, about 25 percent of all U.S. adults have a mental illness in any given year, and 50 percent of us will develop one during our lifetime. Psychologists play a big role in helping people deal with these widespread problems. Luckily, you can use the skillset that you worked extremely hard for and travel the country helping others!

How to Become a Travel Psychologist

Schooling

It’s no surprise that travel therapists; especially psychologists are some of the highest paid healthcare providers out there. This is because if you want to become a travel psychologist, you can expect some extensive and expensive schooling. Initially, you will need a bachelor’s degree that covers in the basics of psychology. This can take anywhere from four to six years depending on how accelerated the program is.

Next, you will need a master’s degree. A master’s degree will give you a broad introduction to the field of psychology. You can then use your electives to focus your study in a particular field. Here you can focus on specific age groups, mental issues, or any other psychological qualification.

Finally, you will need to get your doctoral degree. The required degree for licensure is typically a Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) or Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology (Ph.D.). Your choice of degree will depend on your career goals and whether you want a career in practice (PsyD) or in research (Ph.D.), or some combination thereof. While this all seems like a lot of schooling, just remember that you’ll be getting in an industry that pays well and will always be around.

Internship and Area of Expertise

Another important aspect when you want to become a travel psychologist is putting in the work via an internship. States normally require you to do a two-year supervised internship. This is a good idea for many reasons: you get on-the-job training; you learn whether a certain specialty is right for you, and you get the satisfaction of helping others. Internships in clinical and counseling psychology may need to be approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) because jobs in mental health sometimes require an APA-approved internship.

become a travel psychologist

It’s also important that you start thinking about an area of expertise. While it is possible to have a successful career as a general psychologist, having an area of expertise makes you even more valuable. Areas of expertise can include but are not limited to health psychology, child psychology, neuropsychology, and geropsychology. One of the most popular psychology careers is school psychologists. Luckily, we have plenty of school psychologist jobs available on our site!

Traveling

Now that you’ve been through schooling, completed your internship hours, and found your area of expertise, it’s time to put the “travel” in travel psychologist. If you want to become a travel psychologist, you need to find the ideal place to travel to. That’s where we come in. First, let me provide an article detailing some of the best travel psychology destinations. Whether it’s the mountains of Colorado or the eclectic west coast haven of California, there are plenty of great places to begin your travel psychology career.

Allied Travel Careers can even lend a hand in helping you find the best possible travel psychologist assignment. Our database of hundreds of jobs will ensure that you can travel anywhere in the country as a psychologist. If you want to know how to become a travel psychologist, you’ve come to the right place. You take care of the psychologist part, and we’ll take care of the travel part.

Author: Troy Diffenderfer

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